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Posted on 30th Sep at 3:16 PM, with 91,836 notes
ermefinedining:

This map should be included in every history book.

ermefinedining:

This map should be included in every history book.

Posted on 28th Sep at 9:58 AM, with 501 notes
globalvoices:

Without medical professionals fluent in indigenous languages or without proper interpretation services in Mexican hospitals, there is a risk that patients will not be able to adequately describe what ails them, writes Yásnaya Aguilar in her regular blog column for EstePaís.
Describing Pain in Hospitals Without Indigenous Language Services

globalvoices:

Without medical professionals fluent in indigenous languages or without proper interpretation services in Mexican hospitals, there is a risk that patients will not be able to adequately describe what ails them, writes Yásnaya Aguilar in her regular blog column for EstePaís.

Describing Pain in Hospitals Without Indigenous Language Services

Posted on 27th Sep at 12:50 PM, with 2,215 notes

thechanelmuse:

Hidden Histories: The First Black People Photographed In Britain – In Pictures

  • Peter Jackson, 2 December 1889. Born in 1860 in St Croix, then the Danish West Indies, Jackson was a boxing champion who spent long periods of time touring Europe. In England, he staged the famous fight against Jem Smith at the Pelican Club in 1889. In 1888 he claimed the title of Australian heavyweight champion. (Photograph: Hulton Archive).
  • Johanna Jonkers of the African Choir, 1891. (Photograph: Hulton Archive).
  • Albert Jonas and John Xiniwe of the African Choir, 1891. (Photograph: Hulton Archive).
  • Sara Forbes Bonetta. She was orphaned in inter-tribal warfare in West Africa, captured by slave-raiders, and presented as a ‘gift’ to Queen Victoria at age 5. (Photograph: Courtesy of Paul Frecke).
  • A member of the African Choir, who all had portraits taken at the London Stereoscopic Company in 1891. (Photograph: Hulton Archive).
  • Member of the African Choir, 1891. (Photograph: Hulton Archive).
Posted on 25th Sep at 2:52 PM, with 711 notes

reportagebygettyimages:

'In October 2012, a drone strike in northeast Pakistan killed a 67-year-old woman picking okra outside her house. At a briefing held in 2013 in Washington, DC, the woman’s 13-year-old grandson, Zubair Rehman, spoke to a group of five lawmakers. “I no longer love blue skies,” said Rehman, who was injured by shrapnel in the attack. “In fact, I now prefer gray skies. The drones do not fly when the skies are gray.”'

America’s drone war has killed thousands of people over the last ten years, but the visual record of it is miniscule. After receiving a Getty Images Editorial Grant in 2013, photographer Tomas Van Houtryve set out across the United States to create images that would bring light to the circumstances under which drones operate. He attached his camera to a small drone and aerially photographed the types of targets that drones strike: weddings, funerals, public gatherings.

See more from the project, In Drones We Trust, here.

Posted on 19th Sep at 4:04 PM, with 28,660 notes

america-wakiewakie:

Heartbreaking photos show the first day back to school in Gaza. Many students did not return.

(Photo Credit: Shehab News Agency)

Posted on 18th Sep at 2:49 PM, with 2,955 notes

thepeoplesrecord:

Amazon tribe fights back against illegal loggers, environmental destruction
September 8, 2014

Brazil is the most dangerous place in the world to be an environmentalist. It accounts for about half of all recorded killings of environmental advocates.

And those numbers are going up, globally. As I reported recently for Foreign Policy:

Between 2002 and 2013, at least 908 people were killed because of their environmental advocacy, according to “Deadly Environment,” a new report from the investigative nonprofit Global Witness. That’s an average of at least one environmentalist murdered every week, and in the last four years, the rate of the murders has doubled. In 2012, the deadliest year on record, 147 deaths were recorded, three times more than a decade earlier. “There were almost certainly more cases,” the report says, “but the nature of the problem makes information hard to find, and even harder to verify.”

That incredibly dangerous environment makes what photographer Lunae Parracho documented even more incredible.

Parracho (websiteTwitterFlickr) followed the Ka’apor tribe, an indigenous community in Brazil, as they fought back against illegal loggers.

Ka’apor warriors ventured into the Alto Turiacu territory in the Amazon basin to track down illegal loggers, tie them up, and sabotage their equipment.

They stole their chainsaws and cut the logs so the loggers couldn’t profit from them.

They released the loggers, but only after taking their shoes and clothes, and setting their trucks on fire.

Source

Posted on 18th Sep at 2:31 PM, with 5,970 notes

Amazing Art on Japanese Manhole Covers

In Japan, there are many cities and towns that place visually stunning works of art right underneath pedestrians’ feet. There are almost 6,000 of these covers around the country, turning unattractive necessities into eye candy. Photographer S. Morita has documented hundreds of these covers over the years which are available on Morita’s Flickr page.

Posted on 18th Sep at 9:54 AM, with 679 notes

findout:

From the series Oaxacan Exodous

Nearly 500,000 indigenous Mexican immigrants, mostly Mixtecos, Zapotecos and Triquis, from the state of Oaxaca, are now estimated to be living in the United States. They are among the most isolated immigrants ever to arrive in America. Some speak only their indigenous language, and some come from villages without cars, electricity, or indoor plumbing.

In California’s Central Valley, where over half of these new migrants have settled, they are quickly becoming a new rural underclass. Living on the fringes of the Valley’s farm labor economy, and isolated by their culture and language, they suffer some of the worst abuses and exploitation in the country.

 Matt Black. 

Posted on 16th Sep at 10:27 AM, with 1,194 notes

huffingtonpost:

'No Man's Job': Inside The Lives Of Senegal's Female Mechanics

Photographer Anthony Kurtz traveled to Senegal in 2011 as a volunteer for the organization Walking Tree and later spent 10 days documenting the lives of female auto mechanics in the capital, Dakar.

For more photos of these incredible women go here. 

Posted on 15th Sep at 9:21 AM, with 207,348 notes
comeupkid415:

lolfactory:

The anthropologists decided that this tribe was to remain “uncontacted”.

This is one of the best things iv seen today

comeupkid415:

lolfactory:

The anthropologists decided that this tribe was to remain “uncontacted”.

This is one of the best things iv seen today

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