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Posted on 25th Jul at 9:52 PM, with 620 notes

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Waska Tatay by Thomas Rousset and Raphaël Verona

French photographer Thomas Rousset and graphic designer Raphaël Verona took a trip to Bolivia to encounter a magical world of doctors, spiritual healers and medicine men. They got to know strange rites and rituals, facing some some ancient mythologies.

Rousset and Verona created a book out of the material they’ve collected, emphasizing the tension between old and new, good and evil, spiritual and physical that appears very fascinating. The book ‘Waska Tatay’ is available now from IDPURE.

Posted on 23rd Jul at 8:58 AM, with 619 notes

Krisanne Johnson

I Love You Real Fast

Swaziland

2006-2011

Coming of age for Swazi girls is tough. A tiny African nation of one million, Swaziland is ruled by one of the world’s last remaining absolute monarchies. Its age-old tradition of polygamy and its relaxed attitude toward sexuality have met in a devastating combination for women: Swaziland reports the highest percentage of HIV-positive people in the world, with the hardest hit being young women. For every two young Swazi women, one is HIV-positive. Life expectancy has dropped from 61 to almost 31 over the past ten years. I first went to Swaziland in 2006 to begin documenting the coming of age rites of young women living amidst the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The progression of this work has moved from traditional rites of passage to modern youth culture to intimate look inside the homes of HIV-positive women.

With this work Krisanne Johnson has received the W. Eugene Smith Grant for Humanitarian Photography 2011. She also has been selected for the second prize of the W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography 2009, and  she has obtained the 2009 Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography.

Website

Posted on 22nd Jul at 9:49 PM, with 44,893 notes

forthebrave:

Women of the World

Photos by Steve McCurry

Posted on 22nd Jul at 8:00 PM, with 921 notes
america-wakiewakie:

Previously Uncontacted Tribe Have Contracted Influenza | IFL Science 
Earlier this month, Brazil’s National Indian Foundation (FUNAI) confirmed that an Amazonian tribe that had never before had contact with the outside world had made voluntary contact; a rare event that is usually brought on by threats of violence. Rather than be excited to learn more about the group’s ways and customs, anthropologists have been fearful that the tribe would be exposed to diseases for which they have no immunity. Their worst fears were confirmed when FUNAI announced that those who made contact have indeed contracted the flu, which has annihilated entire tribes in the past.
Based on their hair style and skin ornamentation, it is possible that the individuals who made contact belong to the Chitonahua tribe. Their language is similar to Panoan, which allowed them to communicate with the tribe they found. The isolated people contacted a tribe in Acre, a Brazilian state with a low population density at about 5 per square kilometer. They had been living in Peru along the Xinane River, but were forced to leave in what was likely a threat from illegal loggers or drug traffickers who utilize the river. They reported they had been fired upon.
The two tribal groups co-existed peacefully for about three weeks. During that time, the five men and two women who had made contact fell ill from the flu virus. Doctors were brought in to help provide care, though the indigenous people were initially hesitant to accept the treatment and vaccination. Unfortunately, these people returned to their village without warning. Medical officials are now highly concerned that they will transmit disease to the others which could kill a substantial number of their tribe.
“This news could hardly be more worrying – not only have these people confirmed they suffered violent attacks from outsiders in Peru, but they have apparently already caught flu,” stated Stephen Corry, director of an indigenous people activist group, Survival International. “The nightmare scenario is that they return to their former villages carrying flu with them. It’s a real test of Brazil’s ability to protect these vulnerable groups. Unless a proper and sustained medical program is immediately put in place, the result could be a humanitarian catastrophe.”
In addition to the flu, it is possible that other diseases were picked up during their time of contact. FUNAI is sending a team of health professionals to seek out the tribe and deliver medication, but that help won’t arrive until next month. Until then, officials will have to hope that the disease didn’t spread through the rest of the tribe. Additionally, the people are still threatened by those conducting criminal activity.
"Both Peru and Brazil gave assurances to stop the illegal logging and drug trafficking, which are pushing uncontacted Indians into new areas. They’ve failed. The traffickers even took over a government installation meant to monitor their behavior," Corry said. “The uncontacted Indians now face the same genocidal risk from disease and violence which has characterized the invasion and occupation of the Americas over the last five centuries. No one has the right to destroy these Indians.”
(Photo Credit:  FUNAI)

america-wakiewakie:

Previously Uncontacted Tribe Have Contracted Influenza | IFL Science 

Earlier this month, Brazil’s National Indian Foundation (FUNAI) confirmed that an Amazonian tribe that had never before had contact with the outside world had made voluntary contact; a rare event that is usually brought on by threats of violence. Rather than be excited to learn more about the group’s ways and customs, anthropologists have been fearful that the tribe would be exposed to diseases for which they have no immunity. Their worst fears were confirmed when FUNAI announced that those who made contact have indeed contracted the flu, which has annihilated entire tribes in the past.

Based on their hair style and skin ornamentation, it is possible that the individuals who made contact belong to the Chitonahua tribe. Their language is similar to Panoan, which allowed them to communicate with the tribe they found. The isolated people contacted a tribe in Acre, a Brazilian state with a low population density at about 5 per square kilometer. They had been living in Peru along the Xinane River, but were forced to leave in what was likely a threat from illegal loggers or drug traffickers who utilize the river. They reported they had been fired upon.

The two tribal groups co-existed peacefully for about three weeks. During that time, the five men and two women who had made contact fell ill from the flu virus. Doctors were brought in to help provide care, though the indigenous people were initially hesitant to accept the treatment and vaccination. Unfortunately, these people returned to their village without warning. Medical officials are now highly concerned that they will transmit disease to the others which could kill a substantial number of their tribe.

“This news could hardly be more worrying – not only have these people confirmed they suffered violent attacks from outsiders in Peru, but they have apparently already caught flu,” stated Stephen Corry, director of an indigenous people activist group, Survival International. “The nightmare scenario is that they return to their former villages carrying flu with them. It’s a real test of Brazil’s ability to protect these vulnerable groups. Unless a proper and sustained medical program is immediately put in place, the result could be a humanitarian catastrophe.”

In addition to the flu, it is possible that other diseases were picked up during their time of contact. FUNAI is sending a team of health professionals to seek out the tribe and deliver medication, but that help won’t arrive until next month. Until then, officials will have to hope that the disease didn’t spread through the rest of the tribe. Additionally, the people are still threatened by those conducting criminal activity.

"Both Peru and Brazil gave assurances to stop the illegal logging and drug trafficking, which are pushing uncontacted Indians into new areas. They’ve failed. The traffickers even took over a government installation meant to monitor their behavior," Corry said. “The uncontacted Indians now face the same genocidal risk from disease and violence which has characterized the invasion and occupation of the Americas over the last five centuries. No one has the right to destroy these Indians.”

(Photo Credit:  FUNAI)

Posted on 22nd Jul at 11:41 AM, with 2,452 notes

instagram:

Inspiring Change and an End to Child Marriage with @stephsinclairpix

To learn more about the stories behind the pictures, follow @stephsinclairpix and @tooyoungtowed on Instagram. To see how you can get involved, visit the Too Young To Wed website and the Girl Summit website.

“She looked at me with tears in her eyes and spoke quietly, ‘In my whole life, I have never felt love.’ I continued to hear similar stories as I traveled, researching and photographing child marriage in countries like Nepal, Ethiopia, India and Yemen, Tanzania, South Sudan and even Europe and the US,” says photographer Stephanie Sinclair (@stephsinclairpix), who has spent more than a decade documenting the abuse of women and girls around the world.

Stephanie’s long-term photography project, Too Young To Wed (@tooyoungtowed), joins the UK’s Department for International Development and UNICEF at the first Girl Summit in London.

"I wanted to make sure that we got these images and stories in front of diplomats and policy makers who could enforce laws and support programs to provide more protection for these girls," she says. "I was sure if the rest of the world understood their lives as I had come to, real change wouldn’t be far behind."

Posted on 22nd Jul at 11:40 AM, with 3,564 notes

stevemccurrystudios:

If man has no tea in him, he is incapable of
understanding truth and beauty.  
- Japanese Proverb

We haven’t had any tea for a week.
The bottom is out of the Universe.
- Rudyard Kipling

Exhibition at Leica Gallery, Salzburg, Austria
Opening August 8, 2014

https://twitter.com/McCurryStudios

Posted on 22nd Jul at 9:29 AM, with 85 notes

theoddcollection:

The Toraja are an ethnic group indigenous to a mountainous region of South Sulawesi, Indonesia. They are best known for a row of fascinating funeral rituals.

In Toraja society, the funeral ritual is the most elaborate and expensive event. The death feast is usually attended by thousands and lasts for several days.

Torajans traditionally believe that death is not a sudden, abrupt event, but a gradual process toward Puya (the land of souls, or afterlife). During the waiting period, the body of the deceased is wrapped in several layers of cloth and kept in the family home. The soul of the deceased is thought to linger around the village until the funeral ceremony is completed, after which it begins its journey to Puya.

There are three methods of burial: the coffin may be laid in a cave or in a carved stone grave, or hung on a cliff.
It contains any possessions that the deceased will need in the afterlife. The wealthy are often buried in a stone grave carved out of a rocky cliff. The grave is usually expensive and takes a few months to complete. In some areas, a stone cave may be found that is large enough to accommodate a whole family. The coffin of a baby or child may be hung from ropes on a cliff face or from a tree. This hanging grave usually lasts for years, until the ropes rot and the coffin falls to the ground.

In the ritual called Ma’Nene, that takes place each year in August, the bodies of the deceased are exhumed to be washed, groomed and dressed in new clothes. The mummies are then walked around the village.





Photos:
1. and 2. showing traditional burial places. (Source 2 and Source 1)
3. One of the trees with children “graves”. These trees provide a lot of resign and are believed to nurture those “too young to die” (Source)
4. Ma’Nene Ritual (Source)




For more information see Wikipedia

Posted on 16th Jul at 10:55 AM, with 30 notes
kv96ic28:

An ancient prosthetic eye, on a female skeleton dated 2900 and 2800 BCE. [The eye] has a diameter of 2.5 cm and consists of a light material, probably bitumen paste.
The surface is covered with a thin layer of gold, engraved with a central circle (representing the iris) and gold lines patterned like sun rays. The skeleton was 1.82 m tall (6 feet), much taller than ordinary women of the time. An extraordinarily tall woman wearing an engraved golden eye patterned with rays like a tiny sun!

kv96ic28:

An ancient prosthetic eye, on a female skeleton dated 2900 and 2800 BCE. [The eye] has a diameter of 2.5 cm and consists of a light material, probably bitumen paste.

The surface is covered with a thin layer of gold, engraved with a central circle (representing the iris) and gold lines patterned like sun rays. The skeleton was 1.82 m tall (6 feet), much taller than ordinary women of the time. An extraordinarily tall woman wearing an engraved golden eye patterned with rays like a tiny sun!

Posted on 16th Jul at 8:43 AM, with 1,495 notes

unexplained-events:

The Dogon Tribe

This tribe resides in Mali, West Africa. We learned a lot about this tribe through French anthropologist Marcel Griaule in 1946. Griaule lived with the tribe for 15 years before he was allowed to meet with the blind elder Ogotemmêli(last pic). 

 Ogotemmêli taught him about their own system of astrononmy and about their cosmological religion. He also told them about how a race of aliens from the Sirius system came down and gave them some interesting information. 

Griaule claims that Ogotemmêli told him about there being an extremely dense companion star right next to Sirius which was invisible to the human eye(Sirius-B). Ogotemmêli even talked about a third star that was larger than Sirius B called “Emme Ya.” He also told Griaule about the rings of Saturn and the moons of Jupiter. 

A few years later Robert Temple wrote a book titled The Sirius Mystery. It talks about the accuracy of The Dogon’s system and the precise cosmological facts that they knew about. Even Carl Sagan was impressed by their knowledge (he talks about it in The Demon Haunted World) especially since they did not have any equipment to see that. It would have required them to have a large optical telescope.

By far one of my favorite mysteries. 

Posted on 15th Jul at 10:55 AM, with 3 notes
When languages die, ecosystems often die with them
Living on Earth
Writer Max J. Rosenthal


The study, from the World Wildlife Fund, measured the threat to languages using a scale that tracks how threatened species are. Not only are many languages steadily losing speakers, says co-author Jonathan Loh, but “the rate of decline, globally, is actually very close to the rate of decline in populations of wild vertebrate species.”
There’s the obvious threat of in-demand languages, which many people start speaking more and more as the speakers of smaller languages dwindle. “Thousands of indigenous languages spoken around the world are being replaced by one of a dozen or so dominant world languages like English, Spanish, Mandarin Chinese,” Loh says.
But Loh, who’s also a research associate at the Zoological Society of London, says that languages are dying off due to many of the same issues that plants and animals face.
"Some of the drivers that are driving the extinction of biodiversity — such as increasing global population, increasing consumption of natural resources, increasing globalization and so on — are applicable to languages as well," he says.
And that’s no coincidence. Loh explains that languages have a lot of specific local knowledge built in. “The cultures have evolved in a particular environmental context, so they have an extraordinary amount of traditional ecological knowledge — knowledge of the local species, plants, animals, the medicinal uses of them, the migration patterns of animals behavior,” he says. 
So when the languages die off, much of that knowledge goes with them. “Then children stop learning the language, they also stop acquiring that traditional knowledge,” Loh says. 
There are plenty of linguists who are studying and trying to preserve native languages, but Loh wants to see them work with biologists to make sure that valuable ecological history isn’t missed. “Linguists often don’t have the knowledge of natural history that’s necessary in order to be able to record an endangered language because so much of the lexicon is tied up with names of species or types of ecosystems,” he says. 
He argues that “if we can recognize that culture and nature are inextricably interlinked, then working on a biocultural diversity as a whole, as a subject, would be a more fruitful way of looking at conservation.”
Loh says languages are disappearing mostly quickly in Australia and the Americas. “About three-quarters of the languages of the Americas are under the threat of extinction,” he says, and “95 percent of the indigenous aboriginal Australian languages are … declining extremely rapidly.”
"And, as with species," he warns, "when a language is lost, it’s gone forever. You can never get it back."

July 15, 2014 · 8:45 AM EDT

When languages die, ecosystems often die with them

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