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Posted on 29th Aug at 8:32 AM, with 228 notes
smithsonianlibraries:

detail from Hoover : the story of a crusade. (1926)

The marks on the carpet show how long each stroke should be and a metronome guides her in making a given number of strokes per minute. By measuring her carbon—dioxide exhalation while she works, the amount of energy required to sweep with different devices and in different ways—slow, fast, long strokes, short strokes, etc.—is accurately determined. Such tests were made to determine Hoover technique and they demonstrated that the Hoover offersthe least fatiguing way of cleaning carpets and rugs

smithsonianlibraries:

detail from Hoover : the story of a crusade. (1926)

The marks on the carpet show how long each stroke should be and a metronome guides her in making a given number of strokes per minute. By measuring her carbon—dioxide exhalation while she works, the amount of energy required to sweep with different devices and in different ways—slow, fast, long strokes, short strokes, etc.—is accurately determined. Such tests were made to determine Hoover technique and they demonstrated that the Hoover offers
the least fatiguing way of cleaning carpets and rugs

Posted on 29th Aug at 8:18 AM, with 493 notes

via explore-blog:

Striking photos of public spaces in North Korea vs. South Korea from the Gestalten book Korea — Korea by photographer Dieter Leistner.

(HT The Paris Review)

Posted on 28th Aug at 3:01 PM, with 114 notes
endilletante:


"Viet Nam", photos de Michel Huet, P. Verger, J.Y. Claeys et S. de Sacy. Editions Hoa-Qui, Paris, 1951.

endilletante:

"Viet Nam", photos de Michel Huet, P. Verger, J.Y. Claeys et S. de Sacy. Editions Hoa-Qui, Paris, 1951.

Posted on 22nd Aug at 8:48 AM, with 3,580 notes

dynamicafrica:

For many African communities, markets still play a pivotal role in our daily lives. Markets are not only a center of activity - from bustle to hustle - but are a place for people to shop, socialize and have stimulating interactions. Located in the country’s capital city, Mozambique’s Xipamanine market is one such place.

Let lovely ladies at Nzualo Na’ Khumalo introduce to a place that’s much more than the negative search results it gets.

If you Google the word “Xipamanine” a lot of references might be thrown at you. Some words will pop right up: “Crowded”, “ disorganized”, “cluttered”, “filthy”, etc.

"Don’t let it fool you, Xipamanine is unique business center.  Like most informal markets, it is a world of its own. It is famous for its supersize, but in our opinion it is all the noise and excentric organization that make it unique.

People scream, dance, yell, do anything to get your attention. They’re here to sell. You’re there to buy. Here you can purchase anything from clothing, to construction material, school supplies, food, traditional medicine and even live animals like goats.

The people here are brave. This is people who weren’t afraid to take the little they had to build an empire. People who dared to put themselves out there. People who took the shot.

From mothers to grandfathers, everyone here is striving for something better.

People just like us. That’s why it made sense for us to go there, to trace our inspiration and bring that piece of our soul into Back to the roots.

This is where our grandparents and parents purchased their goods before the existence of Shopping malls with defined infrastructures. It is also where young folks like us come to buy the latest fashion or food to feed their families.

We wanted to showcase in a more honest way the unique feeling and vibe of the market. Our pictures are not edited, for this reason.

We wanted to bring the rawness of its beauty; the texture of its environment; the loudness of people and animals.

FEEL IT, SEE IT, SMEEL IT!!!

This is Xipamanine!”

Posted on 21st Aug at 2:41 PM, with 5,561 notes
saltysojourn:

Mayan Women reversing that white settler-colonial gaze.

saltysojourn:

Mayan Women reversing that white settler-colonial gaze.

Posted on 19th Aug at 12:46 PM, with 2,748 notes

Manu Valcarce

The Other Side of Rio

Since losing its capital status to Brasília in 1960, Rio has been in decline; investment dried up, brains and businesses fled to arch rival São Paulo, and violence became endemic. The number of favelas grew exponentially, and everything from traffic violations to murder seemed to go unpunished.

Since October 2009, when Rio won its bid to hold the Olympics, authorities, spurred on by progressive Mayor Eduardo Paes, have retaken control of several high-profile favelas, sending in battalions of special-operations police to remove the traffickers and then installing a community-based presence called Pacifying Police Units, or UPPs by their Portuguese initials.

So far, 17 UPPs have been set up in 68 different communities, and the results, according to the government, have been overwhelmingly positive. However, the residents can’t wait that long for health, education, water, infrastructures, transport and, most crucially, employment opportunities. There has been no real investment and little in the way of public services, and authorities must provide the same services, jobs and opportunities as the rest of Rio, and doing that requires more utilities and private enterprise.

via darksilenceinsuburbia

Posted on 13th Aug at 2:18 PM, with 100,755 notes

theracismrepellent:

quentintortellini:

History Parallels

1st image: 1967 Newark Riots

2nd image: 2014 Ferguson Protests

3rd image: 1964 Harlem Riots

4th image: 2014 Ferguson Protests

I want to sob…it’s racism but now in color

~Tae

Posted on 12th Aug at 9:23 AM, with 332 notes

black-australia:

Protests, jailing pay off as elder finally sees native title granted

John Watson stood on an Aboriginal picket line at Noonkanbah 36 years ago opposing the mining industry and earned himself a place in Australia’s land rights ­history.

Full article here.

Posted on 7th Aug at 11:23 AM, with 6,164 notes

Wayne Lawrence

Orchard Beach: The Bronx Riviera

Although New York’s Bronx is considered one of the most diverse communities in America out of which many subcultures originated, such as Hip Hop and Salsa, it’s still viewed as a no man’s land by many of the city’s inhabitants. Perhaps it is a matter of simple geography that many refuse to venture to the northernmost of the city’s five boroughs or, quite possibly, it may be the Borough’s malevolent reputation lingering from its tumultuous past.

From its earliest years, the Bronx has been a hotbed of immigrant working class families, but its image has largely been defined by the urban blight of the late 1960’s through to the 1980’s when arson, drug addiction and social neglect decimated many of its neighborhoods. For the families who have called this scarred landscape home, Orchard Beach, the only beach in the borough, was and remains a treasured respite from the sweltering confines of the concrete jungle. Built in the 1930s by urban planner Robert Moses, the beach carries the stigma as being one of the worst in New York and is commonly known as Horseshit Beach or Chocha Beach.

I began shooting portraits of Orchard Beach’s summertime regulars in 2005 shortly after moving to New York, realizing that the stigma attached to this oasis was largely unjustified - I felt compelled to engage with this community of working class families and colorful characters. The photographs in ‘Orchard Beach – The Bronx Riviera’ celebrate the pride and dignity of the beach’s visitors, working-class people.

Immediately catching the viewer’s eye is the extravagant style of many of the photographs’ subjects – a quest for identity and sense of belonging. Some individuals carry scars and markings that hint to their own personal histories, which often reflect the complex history of the borough itself. Within the gaze of those portrayed we see a community standing in defiance of popular opinion.

The six years I spent photographing Orchard Beach have not only given me the time and space to reflect on the importance of family and community, but also a sense of belonging and purpose. After having experienced the most profound grief when my older brother was brutally murdered, photography has not only offered me an opportunity to give a voice to a community often misunderstood but also a means of healing from the loss experienced.

— Wayne Lawrence / INSTITUTE

Via

via darksilenceinsuburbia

Posted on 3rd Aug at 10:31 PM, with 246 notes

fabriciomora:

The Chuquibambilla School, Peru - AMA ( Afonso Maccaglia Architects) + BOSCH arquitectos

Chuquibambilla School Project is a social project that is developing and building a school in the Native Community of Chuquibambilla, in Satipo, Peru.

The school was to become a meeting place for students and teachers, as well as a space for development, meeting and learning for the entire community. The building was designed to have different modules around a central courtyard. The programme includes rooms and outdoor spaces for various academic and administrative activities, covered patios for outdoor teaching and recreational activities, as well as a dormitory for students. The building design sought to make use of the available natural resources and ensure an anti-seismic structure that would withstand the passing of time with minimal maintenance. Other major concerns included cross ventilation, natural lighting, water collection, water treatment and protection against rain and high solar radiation.

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