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Posted on 19th Sep at 4:04 PM, with 20,231 notes

america-wakiewakie:

Heartbreaking photos show the first day back to school in Gaza. Many students did not return.

(Photo Credit: Shehab News Agency)

Posted on 18th Sep at 2:49 PM, with 2,896 notes

thepeoplesrecord:

Amazon tribe fights back against illegal loggers, environmental destruction
September 8, 2014

Brazil is the most dangerous place in the world to be an environmentalist. It accounts for about half of all recorded killings of environmental advocates.

And those numbers are going up, globally. As I reported recently for Foreign Policy:

Between 2002 and 2013, at least 908 people were killed because of their environmental advocacy, according to “Deadly Environment,” a new report from the investigative nonprofit Global Witness. That’s an average of at least one environmentalist murdered every week, and in the last four years, the rate of the murders has doubled. In 2012, the deadliest year on record, 147 deaths were recorded, three times more than a decade earlier. “There were almost certainly more cases,” the report says, “but the nature of the problem makes information hard to find, and even harder to verify.”

That incredibly dangerous environment makes what photographer Lunae Parracho documented even more incredible.

Parracho (websiteTwitterFlickr) followed the Ka’apor tribe, an indigenous community in Brazil, as they fought back against illegal loggers.

Ka’apor warriors ventured into the Alto Turiacu territory in the Amazon basin to track down illegal loggers, tie them up, and sabotage their equipment.

They stole their chainsaws and cut the logs so the loggers couldn’t profit from them.

They released the loggers, but only after taking their shoes and clothes, and setting their trucks on fire.

Source

Posted on 18th Sep at 2:31 PM, with 5,922 notes

Amazing Art on Japanese Manhole Covers

In Japan, there are many cities and towns that place visually stunning works of art right underneath pedestrians’ feet. There are almost 6,000 of these covers around the country, turning unattractive necessities into eye candy. Photographer S. Morita has documented hundreds of these covers over the years which are available on Morita’s Flickr page.

Posted on 18th Sep at 9:54 AM, with 416 notes

findout:

From the series Oaxacan Exodous

Nearly 500,000 indigenous Mexican immigrants, mostly Mixtecos, Zapotecos and Triquis, from the state of Oaxaca, are now estimated to be living in the United States. They are among the most isolated immigrants ever to arrive in America. Some speak only their indigenous language, and some come from villages without cars, electricity, or indoor plumbing.

In California’s Central Valley, where over half of these new migrants have settled, they are quickly becoming a new rural underclass. Living on the fringes of the Valley’s farm labor economy, and isolated by their culture and language, they suffer some of the worst abuses and exploitation in the country.

 Matt Black. 

Posted on 16th Sep at 10:27 AM, with 1,161 notes

huffingtonpost:

'No Man's Job': Inside The Lives Of Senegal's Female Mechanics

Photographer Anthony Kurtz traveled to Senegal in 2011 as a volunteer for the organization Walking Tree and later spent 10 days documenting the lives of female auto mechanics in the capital, Dakar.

For more photos of these incredible women go here. 

Posted on 15th Sep at 9:21 AM, with 178,722 notes
comeupkid415:

lolfactory:

The anthropologists decided that this tribe was to remain “uncontacted”.

This is one of the best things iv seen today

comeupkid415:

lolfactory:

The anthropologists decided that this tribe was to remain “uncontacted”.

This is one of the best things iv seen today

Posted on 11th Sep at 7:51 AM, with 3,974 notes

fotojournalismus:

Boat Migrants Risk Everything for a New Life in Europe

Eight months after a boat carrying hundreds of migrants sank off the coast of Lampedusa, killing more than 360 people and spurring an international outcry, the flow of migrants risking the perilous sea journey to Europe shows no signs of letting up. Already this year, the number of migrants arriving by boat on Italy’s shores has surpassed 40,000, the total number of migrants that arrived in 2013. 

On World Refugee Day, June 20, TIME is publishing a collection of images from photographer Massimo Sestini, who accompanied the Italian navy on its rescue missions earlier this month. The shots depict the treacherous conditions in which tens of thousands of migrants and refugees attempt the crossing, packed in rickety motorboats with limited supplies. But they also reveal, in a manner rarely seen, the human faces of some of the men, women and children who risk everything to make it to Europe.

Posted on 10th Sep at 12:09 PM, with 2 notes
What Happened When A Biracial Woman Was Photoshopped In 18 Different Countries »
Posted on 9th Sep at 8:51 PM, with 6,138 notes
mapsontheweb:

How Africa Would Look Like if its Borders Were Defined By Ethnicity and Language. By George Peter Murdock,1959
Read More

mapsontheweb:

How Africa Would Look Like if its Borders Were Defined By Ethnicity and Language. By George Peter Murdock,1959

Read More

Posted on 5th Sep at 2:53 PM, with 1 note
Languages are being wiped out by economic growth »

Chief Marie Smith Jones, the last speaker of the Eyak language in Alaska, died in 2008 at age 89.

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